Review: The Cow That Sang a Song to the Future – Archyde

28.01.2022 – Ecology meets motorcycling spirits meets dairy farms in Francisca Alegría’s film, which is pleasantly twisted until it runs out of gas

There is an undeniable pleasure in not having the faintest idea where a film is heading and going Francesca Freude – already awarded at Sundance for her short film And the whole sky fit in the dead cow’s eye – seems eager enough to provide it. Beginning with close-ups of suffering fish singing a sad song (the latest victims of the ongoing poisoning of a local river in Chile) and a biker chick emerging from its polluted waters where it has been stuck for decades, The cow that sang a song to the future [+see also:
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quickly makes up his own rules. It’s weird, eerily melancholic and sometimes it doesn’t make sense.

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It’s a testament to Alegría that the film remains a mystery to the end – explaining too much would likely break the spell. The long-dead Magdalena (My master) comes back to her grown children and a husband (Alfred Castro) which, as is implied here, has wronged her in the past, but she is not out for blood. An ambiguous, mute specter, she comes across as curious and eager to absorb experiences that have eluded her for so long. It’s hard to tell if Magdalena is returning because her family will soon face some significant changes or because something bigger is on the horizon, but there she is — a missing link that these long-suffering people clearly need.

Her arrival is just one of many increasingly strange signs. When the apocalypse finally comes, the animals, including those on the family’s dairy farm, are the first to feel it. They are only too happy to leave their horrible existence behind – a bit like the dolphins in the sea The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, although here they hum their final message. It would make an interesting double bill with Andrea Arnold cow [+see also:
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, which also focused on the constant exploitation of her body and her loneliness.

Alegría embraces what magical realism has to offer, and the ordinary constantly collides with the inexplicable: desperate locals protest against environmental decay, wounds heal without a trace, a middle-aged woman (Eleonore Varela) misses the mother she never really got to know. It’s a pity that the film becomes more and more meandering towards the end, some final scenes are crowded together as if by chance and far too many cow close-ups. While granting them some sort of revelation or even closure, their protagonists aren’t given as much time to develop either. I may have dreamed it all, but despite what is shown here, a cautious optimism seems to imply it – just like Adam McKay Don’t look up – When things get tough and the authorities insist on ignoring the signs, you can still try to get closer to your loved ones, at least some of them. Even those who no longer speak – or live -. Considering where we’re all going, there might not be that much to say anyway.

The cow that sang a song to the future was produced by Tom Dercourt and alexandra garcia, co-produced by Shrihari Sathe, Michael Weber, Viola Fugen, Andres wood and Bruno Bettati. ONE Kino de facto and Andrés Wood Producciones production, made in co-production with Match-Factory production, Jirafa Movies, in collaboration with Dialektik, Edge-Frame-Folien, Sovereign Films and whitewater movies. Distribution is via match factory.

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Reference-www.nach-welt.com

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